Public Access to Oklahoma Court Records

Search online public court records from Oklahoma state courts for free. UniCourt allows you to lookup civil, family law, probate, small claims, labour, personal injury and other cases from Oklahoma Superior Courts, Justice Courts, Circuit Courts, & more. With UniCourt, you can look up Oklahoma State Court cases, find latest docket information, view case summary, check case status, download court documents, as well as track cases and get alerts on new filings.

At UniCourt, you can look up Oklahoma State Court records by case name, case number, party, attorney, judge, case type, docket entry & more. You can filter search results further by date of filing, jurisdiction, case type, party type, party representation, and more.

About the Oklahoma Court System

The State of Oklahoma is home to over 3.9 million people and has an area of 69,889 square miles. Founded in 1907, Oklahoma is the 20th largest state in the United States. Oklahoma is home to 39 different tribal nations, including the Cherokee Nation, Choctaw Nation, and Apache Tribe of Oklahoma.

The state’s capital is Oklahoma City, which is the most populous single city in the state with over 680,000 residents. The Oklahoma City Metro Area extends beyond the city to include Canadian, Cleveland, Grady, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, and Oklahoma counties and has a population of over 1.4 million people.

The Oklahoma State Court system consists of three levels: trial courts, intermediate appellate courts, and courts of last resort.

4M+

Oklahoma Cases

26M+

Court Documents

154M+

Docket Entries

Oklahoma Courts of Last Resort

Oklahoma has two different courts of last resort. One court deals with civil matters, while the other handles criminal appeals.

The Oklahoma Supreme Court is one of the highest courts in the state. As a court of last resort, the Supreme Court has jurisdiction over appeals of all civil matters and all matters concerning the Oklahoma Constitution. This Court also oversees the administration of the court system across the entire state, including the behavior of attorneys in the state.

The Supreme Court is composed of nine justices, including one Chief Justice. These justices are appointed by the Governor to serve life terms, but they are subject to retention elections every six years in which voters choose whether or not they should remain on the Court.

The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals is the second of the courts of last resort in the state. The Court of Criminal Appeals has jurisdiction over all appeals of criminal matters, and is always the first court to hear an appeal involving the death sentence.

This Court of Criminal Appeals has five justices, including one Chief Judge who is selected at the start of each term of the court. Like the Supreme Court, these justices are appointed by the Governor to life terms subject to retention elections every six years.

To be eligible to be a justice on a court of last resort in Oklahoma, a person must be at least 30 years old, have previously been licensed as an attorney for five years, and have lived for at least one year in the judicial district from which they are selected.

The Oklahoma courts of last resort decided approximately 150 cases in 2020. The Court has been involved with many important cases in U.S. jurisprudence, including McGirt v. Oklahoma, Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta, and Maynard v. Cartwright.

Oklahoma Intermediate Appellate Court

The Oklahoma Court of Civil Appeals is the state's intermediate appellate court and reviews decisions of civil matters from the trial courts. This Court handles the majority of appeals in the state. Cases are assigned to the Court of Civil Appeals by the Oklahoma Supreme Court.

The Court of Civil Appeals is composed of four divisions, two of which are located in Oklahoma City and two of which are in Tulsa. Each division has three judges, for a total of 12 judges on the Court. These judges are appointed by the Governor from a list of three names compiled by the Oklahoma Judicial Nominating Commission. The judges serve terms of six years and are subject to retention elections.

To be eligible to be a Court of Civil Appeals judge, a person must be a qualified voter in their district for at least one year and be licensed to practice law for at least four years, or have four years of service as a judge of a court of record.

Trial Courts

Oklahoma has two separate trial courts levels: the District Courts and the Municipal Courts.

District Courts

The Oklahoma District Courts are the state’s highest trial courts with general jurisdiction. These Courts hear the majority of cases in Oklahoma, and have jurisdiction over both civil and criminal matters. Oklahoma has 77 District Courts, each with multiple judges. The District Courts are divided across 26 judicial districts, each serving multiple counties.

These Judicial Administrative Districts each select one judge from all the District Courts in their area to serve as Presiding Judge. The Presiding Judge handles court administration in addition to standard duties, and reports to the Oklahoma Supreme Court.

Judges of the Oklahoma District Courts are selected in nonpartisan elections to serve four year terms, after which they must run for re-election to remain on the court. To be eligible to serve on the District Courts, a person must be a qualified voter in their district and have been licensed to practice law for at least four years, or alternatively, have four years of service as a judge of a court of record.

Municipal Courts

The Municipal Courts in Oklahoma have jurisdiction over cases involving the violation of city ordinances. These courts do not hear civil complaints and grievances by private individuals. There are only two Municipal Courts of Record in Oklahoma, located in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. All other Municipal Courts in the state are Courts Not of Record, meaning no record of the proceedings is taken down for later use.

Judges of the Oklahoma Municipal Courts of Record are appointed to two-year terms by the governing body of the municipality. To serve on a Municipal Court of Record, a person must be licensed to practice law for at least two years or have two years of experience as a judge of a court of record.

In contrast, judges of the Oklahoma Municipal Courts Not of Record are appointed to two-year terms by the mayor with approval from the governing body of the municipality. To serve on these courts, a person must be licensed to practice law in the state and be a registered voter in the county of nomination.

Oklahoma Workers’ Compensation Court of Existing Claims

The Workers' Compensation Court of Existing Claims is a court in Oklahoma that has jurisdiction over claims for compensation, liability of insurers, and any rights asserted under the Workers' Compensation Act.

Judges of the Oklahoma Workers' Compensation Court of Existing Claims are appointed to six year terms by the Governor, with the advice and consent of the Oklahoma State Senate. Appointments are made from a list of nominees from the Judicial Nominating Commission. To be eligible to serve on this court, a person must have a law degree.

Oklahoma Council on Judicial Complaints

Established by the Oklahoma Constitution, the Oklahoma Council on Judicial Complaints (“COJC” or “the Council”) receives and investigates complaints concerning the alleged misconduct of Oklahoma judges. As an independent agency of the Executive branch, the COJC has the investigative powers of a grand jury, but cannot issue discipline or change a judge's opinion or a jury verdict as it is an investigatory body, not a prosecutorial or adjudicative body. The Council may forward the findings of investigations to either the Chief Justice of the Oklahoma Supreme Court or another entity that may choose to initiate disciplinary proceedings.

The Council has three members and only two members may be part of the Oklahoma Bar Association. One member is appointed by the President pro tempore of the Oklahoma Senate, one member is appointed by the Speaker of the Oklahoma House of Representatives, and the third member is appointed by the President of the Oklahoma Bar Association. While in office, members of the COJC are not eligible for appointment to the Oklahoma Judicial Nominating Commission.

Oklahoma Court Statistics

  • A court system was created in Oklahoma in the 1890s, before it became a state, but that system was continued by the framers of the Oklahoma Constitution after obtaining statehood in 1907.
  • The Court of Criminal Appeals has more than 1,200 pending cases in 2023.
  • The Oklahoma Supreme Court has approximately 180 employees.
  • Oklahoma County has the busiest courts in the state, processing over 20,000 filings per year.

Why use UniCourt to search for Oklahoma Court Cases?

UniCourt is your single source for state and federal court records, offering comprehensive court coverage and the most complete and accurate dataset available.

Each day, UniCourt collects all of the newly filed civil and criminal cases in the Oklahoma Courts we cover and lets you search through those new case filings in our CrowdSourced Library™. UniCourt also allows you to track state court litigation and have real-time case alerts sent directly to your inbox. Additionally, UniCourt empowers you to download court documents on-demand without ever having to login to a government court database, and gives you unlimited access to download millions of free state and federal court documents in our CrowdSourced Library™.

UniCourt provides you with access to several Oklahoma State Courts, including many of the largest counties across the state, such as the Oklahoma County Courts, the Tulsa County Courts, the Lincoln County Courts, the Jackson County Courts, and the Delaware County Courts.

UniCourt also gives you access to court records for all of the federal courts across the state of Oklahoma.

U.S. Court of Appeals

UniCourt’s industry-leading Legal Data APIs provide Enterprise users with on-demand, bulk access to structured data from Oklahoma state and federal courts. Our Legal Data as a Service (LDaaS) collects, organizes, standardizes, and normalizes court data from Oklahoma state courts and all federal courts, and makes it readily available via our UniCourt Enterprise API for business development, competitive intelligence, litigation strategy, and docket management.

Oklahoma

Filter