This case was last updated from Los Angeles County Superior Courts on 10/23/2019 at 14:23:13 (UTC).

PATRICIA M. SALUTE VS. CAMERON MARIE SIMINSKI AND DOES 1-5

Case Summary

On 12/02/2016 PATRICIA M SALUTE filed a Property - Other Real Property lawsuit against CAMERON MARIE SIMINSKI AND DOES 1-5. This case was filed in Los Angeles County Superior Courts, Van Nuys Courthouse East located in Los Angeles, California. The Judges overseeing this case are JOHN J. KRALIK, FRANK J. JOHNSON, ELAINE W. MANDEL, SHIRLEY K. WATKINS and MICHAEL J. CONVEY. The case status is Not Classified By Court.

Case Details Parties Documents Dockets

 

Case Details

  • Case Number:

    ****5088

  • Filing Date:

    12/02/2016

  • Case Status:

    Not Classified By Court

  • Case Type:

    Property - Other Real Property

  • Court:

    Los Angeles County Superior Courts

  • Courthouse:

    Van Nuys Courthouse East

  • County, State:

    Los Angeles, California

Judge Details

Presiding Judges

JOHN J. KRALIK

FRANK J. JOHNSON

ELAINE W. MANDEL

SHIRLEY K. WATKINS

MICHAEL J. CONVEY

 

Party Details

Plaintiffs and Cross Defendants

SALUTE PATRICIA M.

ROES 1-10

Defendants and Cross Plaintiffs

DOES 1-5

SIMINSKI CAMERON MARIE

PENNYMAC LOAN SERVICES LLC

Defendant and Intervenor

PENNYMAC LOAN SERVICES LLC

Attorney/Law Firm Details

Plaintiff Attorney

FORRY CRAIG BRIAN

Defendant Attorneys

HAYDEN GLENN MELBOURNE

KROLL JANICE MAUREEN

CHANG CHERYL STEPHANIE

Intervenor Attorney

KING MICHAEL GEORGE

 

Court Documents

Notice - NOTICE OF CONTINUANCE OF OSC

7/30/2019: Notice - NOTICE OF CONTINUANCE OF OSC

Proof of Service by Mail

6/3/2019: Proof of Service by Mail

Memorandum of Points & Authorities

6/6/2019: Memorandum of Points & Authorities

Certificate of Mailing for - Certificate of Mailing for Minute Order (Court Order) of 02/13/2019

2/13/2019: Certificate of Mailing for - Certificate of Mailing for Minute Order (Court Order) of 02/13/2019

Notice of Case Management Conference

12/2/2016: Notice of Case Management Conference

Civil Case Cover Sheet

12/2/2016: Civil Case Cover Sheet

Answer

1/17/2017: Answer

Notice of Case Reassignment and Order for Plaintiff to Give Notice

8/16/2017: Notice of Case Reassignment and Order for Plaintiff to Give Notice

Substitution of Attorney

4/9/2018: Substitution of Attorney

Minute Order - Minute order entered: 2018-04-19 00:00:00

4/19/2018: Minute Order - Minute order entered: 2018-04-19 00:00:00

Minute Order - Minute order entered: 2018-09-18 00:00:00

9/18/2018: Minute Order - Minute order entered: 2018-09-18 00:00:00

Legacy Document - LEGACY DOCUMENT TYPE: Miscellaneous

9/24/2018: Legacy Document - LEGACY DOCUMENT TYPE: Miscellaneous

Statement of Decision - Statement of Decision *TENTATIVE*

10/9/2018: Statement of Decision - Statement of Decision *TENTATIVE*

Minute Order - Minute Order (Court Order re: Peremptory Challenge)

11/20/2018: Minute Order - Minute Order (Court Order re: Peremptory Challenge)

Substitution of Attorney

12/13/2018: Substitution of Attorney

Notice of Case Management Conference

12/6/2018: Notice of Case Management Conference

Order Appointing Court Approved Reporter as Official Reporter Pro Tempore -

9/25/2018: Order Appointing Court Approved Reporter as Official Reporter Pro Tempore -

Trial Brief -

7/9/2018: Trial Brief -

105 More Documents Available

 

Docket Entries

  • 10/22/2019
  • DocketNotice of Intent to Move for New Trial; Filed by PennyMac Loan Services, LLC (Defendant)

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  • 10/07/2019
  • Docketat 10:17 AM in Department U, Michael J. Convey, Presiding; Court Order

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  • 10/07/2019
  • DocketNotice of Entry of Judgment / Dismissal / Other Order; Filed by Clerk

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  • 10/07/2019
  • DocketJudgment ([PROPOSED] JUDGMENT); Filed by Cameron Marie Siminski (Defendant)

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  • 10/07/2019
  • DocketCertificate of Mailing for ((Court Order) of 10/07/2019); Filed by Clerk

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  • 10/07/2019
  • DocketMinute Order ( (Court Order)); Filed by Clerk

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  • 09/30/2019
  • Docketat 3:00 PM in Department U, Michael J. Convey, Presiding; Order to Show Cause Re: (Entry of Judgment) - Held

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  • 09/30/2019
  • DocketOrder Appointing Court Approved Reporter as Official Reporter Pro Tempore (Rose Heffernan (818)489-3478); Filed by Cameron Marie Siminski (Defendant)

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  • 09/30/2019
  • DocketMinute Order ( (Order to Show Cause Re: Entry of Judgment)); Filed by Clerk

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  • 09/27/2019
  • Docketat 08:30 AM in Department U, Michael J. Convey, Presiding; Order to Show Cause Re: (Entry of Judgment) - Held - Continued

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135 More Docket Entries
  • 01/17/2017
  • DocketAnswer; Filed by Patricia M. Salute (Plaintiff)

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  • 12/27/2016
  • DocketCross-Complaint; Filed by Cameron Marie Siminski (Defendant)

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  • 12/27/2016
  • DocketSummons-Issued; Filed by Cameron Marie Siminski (Defendant)

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  • 12/27/2016
  • DocketAnswer; Filed by Cameron Marie Siminski (Defendant)

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  • 12/19/2016
  • DocketNotice of Lis Pendens; Filed by Patricia M. Salute (Plaintiff)

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  • 12/05/2016
  • DocketProof of Service of Summons and Complaint; Filed by Patricia M. Salute (Plaintiff)

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  • 12/02/2016
  • DocketCivil Case Cover Sheet; Filed by Patricia M. Salute (Plaintiff)

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  • 12/02/2016
  • DocketComplaint; Filed by Patricia M. Salute (Plaintiff)

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  • 12/02/2016
  • DocketSummons; Filed by Patricia M. Salute (Plaintiff)

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  • 12/02/2016
  • DocketNotice of Case Management Conference; Filed by Clerk

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Tentative Rulings

Case Number: LC105088    Hearing Date: August 13, 2020    Dept: U

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA

FOR THE COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES - NORTHWEST DISTRICT

PATRICIA M. SALUTE,

vs.

CAMERON MARIE SIMINSKI; and DOES 1-5, inclusive,

CAMERON MARIE SIMINSKI,

vs.

PATRICIA M. SALUTE; and ROES 1-10, inclusive,

PENNYMAC LOAN SERVICES, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company,

CASE NO: LC105088

[TENTATIVE] ORDER RE:

DEFENDANT CAMERON MARIE SIMINSKI’S MOTION FOR LEAVE TO AMEND HER CROSS-COMPLAINT

Dept. U

8:30 a.m.

August 13, 2020

I. BACKGROUND

Patricia M. Salute (Salute) initiated this suit against her daughter, Cameron Marie Siminski (Siminski), on December 2, 2016, raising claims for partition of real property, breach of oral contract, and declaratory relief.

On December 27, 2016, Siminski filed a cross-complaint against Salute asserting claims for cancellation of instrument, accounting, conversion and declaratory relief.  In the cross-complaint, Siminski alleges that various loans were obtained by Salute who encumbered the property with these loans, all without Siminski’s knowledge or consent.  Through her declaratory relief action, Siminski requests a declaration cancelling a grant deed that transferred a joint interest in the property to Salute and stating that Siminski possesses all interest in the property.  She did not seek a specific declaration invalidating the 2010 Deed of Trust recorded on the property to secure a loan held by PennyMac Loan Services, LLC (PennyMac), nor did she name PennyMac as a cross-defendant. 

PennyMac was apparently alerted to this action on September 29, 2017, when it was served with a subpoena to produce loan documents.  On March 27, 2018, PennyMac filed a motion for leave to intervene in this action to assert claims for quiet title in favor of its Deed of Trust, for declaratory relief to the effect that the Deed of Trust is valid and enforceable, and for equitable enforcement of PennyMac’s lien on the property.  In its proposed Complaint-in-Intervention and motion to intervene, PennyMac alleged that Siminski had refused to stipulate to the validity of the Deed of Trust and that its intervention was proper to protect its interest in the property against any argument by Salute or Siminski to invalidate the Deed of Trust.  In opposition to the motion, Siminski argued that that there was no need for intervention because, even if she was successful, PennyMac’s trust deed would still be attached to the property.  The Court granted intervention on April 19, 2018.

The matter was set for trial to begin on September 17, 2018.  In her July 9, 2018 trial brief, Siminski argued that her signature on the Deed of Trust was forged and not notarized.  She opposed PennyMac’s declaratory relief action, inter alia, on the grounds that she did not sign the Deed of Trust and did not have knowledge of the recording against the property, that the escrow officer was unlicensed, biased and an agent of PennyMac, and that PennyMac had unclean hands with respect to the inclusion of Siminski in the loan transaction, the Deed of Trust, and/or its recordation.  Siminski also argued that, if the Grant Deed transferring title from her to Salute and her as joint tenants was found to be invalid, the Deed of Trust should be canceled and invalidated as a lien on the property, leaving PennyMac to seek recovery of an unsecured debt from Salute. 

The case went to trial before the Honorable Elaine Mandel in September of 2018 and resulted in a tentative decision in favor of Siminski.  Judge Mandel was transferred to another department and the Honorable Michael J. Convey issued the final Statement of Decision, ruling that the subject property belonged to Siminski free and clear of any liens by PennyMac.  In both the tentative decision by Judge Mandel and the final decision by Judge Convey, there was a ruling invalidating the 2010 Deed of Trust as part of Siminski’s request for cancellation under Civil Code section 3412 and finding that PennyMac’s recovery, if any, would be against Salute personally and not as a lien against the property.

On December 6, 2019, PennyMac’s motion for a new trial was granted by Judge Convey on the primary ground that the final Statement of Decision was not issued by the trial judge, which constituted an irregularity in the proceedings that denied the parties a full and fair trial on the merits. Judge Convey also ruled that PennyMac’s other arguments warranted a new trial, including that it was improper for the Court to invalidate the Deed of Trust because Siminski had not sought that relief in her cross-complaint. 

On March 20, 2020, Simiski moved for leave to amend her cross-complaint to add claims against PennyMac. The Court heard this motion on June 25, 2020 and continued the hearing to August 13, 2020 to give the parties a further opportunity to provide evidence and briefing on PennyMac’s contention that it would be prejudiced if the Court granted an amendment at this juncture in the case.   

II. LEGAL STANDARDS AND DISCUSSION

A. Procedural Requirements

California Rules of Court, rule 3.1324 requires a motion seeking leave to amend to include a copy of the proposed pleadings, to identify the amendments, and to be accompanied by a declaration including the following facts:

1) The effect of the amendment;

2) Why the amendment is necessary and proper;

3) When the facts giving rise to the amended allegations were discovered; and

4) The reasons why the request for amendment was not made earlier.

Siminski included a copy of her proposed First Amended Cross-Complaint identifying the amendments as three causes of action alleging: (1) cancellation of instruments; (2) quiet title; and (3) declaratory relief against PennyMac.

Siminski’s attorney, Glenn M. Hayden (Hayden), provided evidence in a declaration. Hayden states that the effect of the amendment will be the addition of the three causes of action against PennyMac. He provides the amendment will not prejudice opposing parties because it does not plead any new parties into the case and the testimony presented will be identical to that presented in the first trial.  Hayden states that the amendment is necessary and proper because it will prevent confusion and notes that PennyMac’s verified Complaint-in-Intervention raises the same issues through its request for declaratory relief seeking a judicial determination of its rights and interest in the property.  Hayden reasons this is what the Court decided in the first trial when it found that PennyMac had no interest in the property.

While Hayden does not state when Siminski learned of the facts giving rise to the amended allegations, the Court infers from the procedural history that Siminski learned that her rights in the property were in conflict with PennyMac’s between its intervention in April 2018 and Siminski’s trial brief in July 2018 when she argued that the Deed of Trust should be invalidated along with the challenged Grant Deed. 

The record also discloses when Siminski learned that her cross-complaint needed amendment.  In opposition to PennyMac’s new trial motion, Siminski argued that the Court’s final statement of decision invalidating the 2010 Deed of Trust and denying PennyMac any lien on the property was properly grounded on the issues raised by PennyMac’s own Complaint-in-Intervention.  In granting a new trial in December 2019, Judge Convey rejected this argument finding that the post-trial decision invalidating the Deed of Trust could not stand because Siminski had not sought such relief against PennyMac in her cross-complaint.  Plainly it was this ruling that prompted Siminski’s motion to amend in March 2020.    

The Court finds that, although the relevant procedural history was only partially explained in her moving papers, Siminski has satisfied the procedural requirements of California Rules of Court, rule 3.1324.  As a result, the Court turns to the merits of the motion. 

B. Request for Judicial Notice

PennyMac requests judicial notice be taken of: (1) the October 9, 2018 tentative statement of decision; (2) the May 9, 2019 minute order; (3) the June 14, 2019 final statement of decision; (4) the October 7, 2019 judgment; and (5) the December 6, 2019 order granting PennyMac’s Motion for a New Trial.

The Court takes judicial notice of these documents pursuant to California Evidence Code section 452(d) because each is a record of this Court.

C. Motion to Amend

The Court may grant leave to amend the pleadings at any stage of the action. A party may discover the need to amend after all pleadings are completed and new information requires a change in the nature of the claims or defenses previously pleaded. Such changes usually cannot be made via ex parte procedure. Rather, a formal motion to amend must be served and filed. (Dye v. Caterpillar, Inc. (2011) 195 Cal.App.4th 1366, 1380.) Motions for leave to amend the pleadings are directed to the sound discretion of the judge. “The court may, in furtherance of justice, and on any terms as may be proper, allow a party to amend any pleading . . . .” (Code Civ. Proc. § 473(a)(1) & § 576.)

“If the motion to amend is timely made and the granting of the motion will not prejudice the opposing party, it is error to refuse permission to amend and where the refusal also results in a party being deprived of the right to assert a meritorious cause of action or a meritorious defense, it is not only error but an abuse of discretion.” (Morgan v. Super. Ct. (1959) 172 Cal.App.2d 527, 530; Mabie v. Hyatt, supra, 61 Cal.App.4th at 596; Bettencourt v. Hennessy Industries, Inc. (2012) 205 Cal.App.4th 1103, 1111 [abuse of discretion to deny leave to amend when there is a “reasonable possibility” that defect can be cured].) Prejudice exists where the amendment would result in a delay of trial, along with loss of critical evidence, added costs of preparation, increased burden of discovery, etc. (Magpali v. Farmers Group, Inc. (1996) 48 Cal.App.4th 471, 486-488.) The fact that the amendment involves a change in legal theory that would make admissible evidence damaging to the opposing party is not the kind of prejudice the court will consider. (Hirsa v. Super. Ct. (1981) 118 Cal.App.3d 486, 490.)

This Court has discretion to permit any type of amendment. The amendment does not need to relate to the claims or defenses originally pleaded. Thus, amended pleadings may set forth entirely different claims, add new parties, or seek a different or greater remedy. However, the Court has discretion to deny leave to amend where a proposed amendment fails to state a valid cause of action or defense. (California Casualty Gen. Insurance Co. v. Super. Ct. (1985) 173 Cal.App.3d 274, 280-281, disapproved on other grounds.)

PennyMac opposes this motion by arguing that if Siminiski seeks to amend her cross-complaint to conform to proof, she should have done so during the original trial. Moreover, Siminiski fails to identify what “proof” she is referring to because no factual proof exists. PennyMac also argues Siminiski’s amendment inappropriately tries to revive the decision in the prior trial that is not binding because Judge Convey granted a new trial. 

In light of the Court’s order granting a new trial, the time for amending according to proof at trial has clearly passed.  Further, the proposed amendment cannot “revive” the decision following the first trial.  The Court does not read the motion to amend as an effort to do so. 

Still, a review of the trial proceedings strongly undermines PennyMac’s contention that the validity of the 2010 Deed of Trust is an entirely new issue that was not under consideration during the first trial.  That Siminiski raised arguments in her July 2018 trial brief that are nearly identical to those now sought to be added to her cross-complaint supports the argument that these issues have been in play in this action for at least two years.  The fact that both Siminski and PennyMac submitted evidence at trial regarding the validity and enforceability of the 2010 Deed of Trust fortifies Siminski’s argument that PennyMac had notice of her efforts to obtain an order voiding the trust deed and submitted evidence in opposition to this argument.  Indeed, it appears from the papers submitted that loan officer Lisa Goldsmith and notary Claudia Isaza, both of whom were involved in the execution and recording of the 2010 Deed of Trust, appeared as witnesses at trial, as well as PennyMac’s handwriting expert who testified about whether Siminski actually signed various documents that she challenged as having not been executed by her.  All this evidence drawn from the procedural history of this case demonstrates that PennyMac cannot claim that it lacked notice of Siminski’s contentions regarding the enforceability of the 2010 Deed of Trust or the opportunity to marshal evidence regarding those contentions. 

PennyMac asserts that Siminiski’s delay in bringing this motion is inexcusable because no new facts have been discovered to warrant any amendment.  As noted above, however, the new development faced by Siminski was the Court’s December 2019 ruling that she cannot seek to invalidate PennyMac’s lien simply by opposing its Complaint-in-Intervention, but instead must include claims against PennyMac in her cross-complaint.  It is clear that Siminski’s motion to amend was made in response to that ruling, and it was timely made in advance of any trial setting conference for the new trial secured by PennyMac. 

Finally, PennyMac urges the Court to deny the motion maintaining that it will be prejudiced if this motion is granted because it will be added as a cross-defendant for the first time and because Siminski’s amended cross-complaint would require it to litigate this case from the beginning and conduct significant new discovery, much of which is now unavailable to it.

PennyMac argues that, in preparation for the previous trial, it conducted only limited discovery which focused on the conduct of Salute and Siminski when the loan was obtained.  To defend against Siminski’s cancellation of instrument claim, PennyMac argues it would need to determine whether Siminski had knowledge of or consented to the loan and whether the 2010 Deed of Trust was signed. This would require deposing the preparer of the 2010 Deed of Trust and witnesses to its execution. PennyMac contends that the records of the escrow and realty company have been destroyed due to the passage of time. PennyMac also claims it may need an expert witness to review the loan files. PennyMac previously deposed Lisa Goldsmith, the real estate coordinator on the loan, who testified that she only vaguely remembered the transaction. PennyMac argues it would also need to conduct further discovery to determine if Siminski benefited from the loan funds.

In addition to arguing that all the issues raised by the amended cross-complaint were first put at issue by PennyMac’s own complaint-in-intervention, Siminski argues that PennyMac will not be prejudiced by her first amended cross-complaint because PennyMac was present at almost every deposition conducted in the prior proceeding, hired an expert who testified at trial that lenders were loaning money based on borrower’s income if confirmed by an employer, and subpoenaed many of its own witnesses in addition to having full access to Salute’s and Siminski’s witnesses at trial.  Lastly, Siminski argues that the Judge in the prior trial determined that the 2010 Deed of Trust was void, thereby, evidencing that the enforceability of the 2010 Deed of Trust is not a new issue.

The procedural history, as evidenced by PennyMac’s complaint-in-intervention, Siminski’s trial brief, and the now-vacated statement of decision, demonstrates that the validity of the 2010 Deed of Trust and whether it could be enforced against the property were at issue in 2018 when the parties were conducting discovery in preparation for trial.  There is nothing submitted by PennyMac showing that any of the evidence it claims to be no longer available was lost or destroyed during the last two years since the trial commenced.  The Court cannot find, therefore, that any delay in amending the cross-complaint resulted in the loss of key evidence. 

Even so, given the contentions of the parties in 2018, PennyMac’s decision to conduct only limited discovery on the validity of the 2010 Deed of Trust was plainly not warranted.  If the contentions laid out in Siminski’s trial brief had been wholly new allegations, PennyMac could have sought exclusion of certain evidence or arguments at trial or the reopening of discovery to fortify its position at trial.  It apparently did not do so.  The Court infers from this procedural history that PennyMac understood the scope of the issues to be tried and now offers a different view of the procedural history to take advantage of a pleading deficiency found by the Court. 

PennyMac also argues that it will be prejudiced by the need to conduct further discovery and simultaneously contends that it should be permitted to do so.  The fact that PennyMac may need to depose a few additional witnesses to defend its 2010 Deed of Trust does not amount to prejudice that should preclude Siminski from resolving all issues surrounding the property in a single action. The validity of the 2010 Deed of Trust has long been an issue in this matter as it was first raised in PennyMac’s complaint-in-intervention and forcefully challenged by Siminski in her trial brief and presumably at trial.  The lost evidence cannot be considered prejudice that would bar amendment since its unavailability was apparently discovered through discovery for the original trial in 2018.  What is more, because a new trial has been granted, the Court is open to the notion of providing additional time to complete further discovery before the commencement of the second trial.

Given Siminski’s prompt motion after learning of the pleading defect, the fact that the validity of the trust deed has been at issue since 2018, and that PennyMac has shown no prejudice that would result from the granting of the motion, the Court grants the motion to amend.  This ruling is in keeping with the state’s liberal policy of allowing amendments to pleadings at any time, absent undue delay or prejudice, to ensure that matters are resolved on the merits rather than based on technical pleading defects.

III. CONCLUSION

For the foregoing reasons, Siminski’s motion for leave to amend her cross-complaint is GRANTED.  The proposed First Amended Cross-Complaint is to be filed by Siminski withint ten days of this Court’s ruling.

Siminski is to give notice of the Court’s ruling.

DATED: August 13, 2020

_____________________

Hon. Theresa M. Traber

Judge of the Superior Court